Rhythmic Robot Audio PatchVault 770 KONTAKT

Trust_Uploader

Active Member
96534ea532731c8f0bf06858619dd096.jpg

Rhythmic Robot Audio PatchVault 770 KONTAKT | 808 Mb
The Korg 770 may be small, but it's mighty - not in a MiniMoog way, more in a BBC Radiophonics Workshop synth-puppy way. From a handful of wires and diodes comes all manner of frankly amazing and wonderful sounds, thanks to some pretty barmy topology and a whole load of unusual surprises: the Chorus wave on Oscillator 1, or the two forms of ring modulation built right in, or the musically brilliant Scale Noise which we're now nicking and building into all our new synths.

So any chance to fiddle with the 770 is a chance we happily take, and when we finally got our hands on a copy of Korg's original manual for the machine, we were instantly grabbed by the fact that it had presets. Yes indeedy, at the back of the manual are patchsheets for 24 factory sounds - or, as Korg called them back in the day, InstaSets. (They turn out to be not all that Insta, cos you have to dial them in yourself; but who's complaining when you get sounds like Funky Cat and Banjo as a result?!) And thus a PatchVault was born.
Well, almost - because, let's be honest, synth tastes have changed a bit since Korg's programming engineers came up with the wonders of Funky Cat and Banjo. As we programmed them in and played them, we couldn't help feeling that a few of the factory InstaSets were rather at the niche end of the spectrum (Foghorn and Wave, for example, is really only useful if you, erm, want the sound of a Foghorn and Wave). With that in mind we decided to go a little further - so as well as the more musically-useful InstaSets (Violin, Electric Bass, Tuba, the really brilliant Gambang, and others) we also decided to let Mongo loose on the 770 and let him hammer some patches out of it. This PatchVault, then, is in two parts: the original Factory sounds and a batch of Mongo Specials. It's really pretty easy to tell them apart, since one lot sound like they were programmed by a bespectacled Japanese engineer in the mid 1970s, while the others sound like the 770 is being tortured but somehow enjoying it. It's an odd (but we feel oddly compelling) contrast.
Check my blog!

Recommend Download Link Hight Speed | Please Say Thanks Keep Topic Live
Code:
Please, Log in or Register to view codes content!
 
Top